Information on the following plaques can be found on this page, please click on the relevant picture.

image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster

Baker Perkins Apprentice School

Barrass Memorial Hall

County Grammar School

Crescent Bridge

Deacons School

The Angel Inn

image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster
image missing notify webmaster

Dr Thomas James Walker

Electric Transport

Great Northern Hotel

The Hake Family

Henry Penn

Sir Henry Royce

To find more of our 1985 to 2012 plaques please return to the Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu page.

This page is tested on Mozilla Firefox so results with other browsers may vary in appearance


Baker Perkins Apprentice School

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

This building was the first apprentice training school to be purpose-built in the United Kingdom after the Second World War, at a cost of £68,000. In the 38 years between its opening in 1954 and its closure in 1991, approximately 2,500 apprentices were trained here, providing much needed engineering craftsmen, technicians and professional engineers.

The approaches to engineering training developed here by Baker Perkins were of national significance and were adopted by the Engineering Industry Training Board in the 1960s for use throughout the UK. Baker Perkins were the world leaders in the manufacture of food and printing machinery and a key local general engineering company. The company occupied a ten acre site on Westfield Road from 1904 to 1991, the headquarters situated to the west of the Apprentice School. Further details of the company's history and photographs as well as apprenticeship training can be found at Baker Perkins Westwood Works (this will open in a new window or tab).

The original opening ceremony (lower left), the plaque that was erected at the time was discovered inside the building and mounted externally at the same time as the Civic Society Plaque on 23 July 2007. Baker Perkins continues to have a presence in the city. Photos thanks to Peterborough Images Archive.

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


Barrass Memorial Hall

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

The original Barrass Memorial Hall (a church hall and Sunday School) stood next to the Baptist Church in Queen Street and was opened in May 1904. It was a memorial to the Rev. Thomas Barrass who came to Peterborough in 1852 to minister to the small Baptist congregation in Westgate. With love and care he increased that small congregation into one of several hundred by the time he retired in 1900, and such was the respect in which he was held that he was colloquially known as the 'Non-conformist Bishop of Peterborough'. He died a year after his retirement. The Queen Street Baptist chapel was destroyed by fire in October 1905 and the Hall was badly damaged. A new site, in Park Road, was chosen to build a new church together with a new Barrass Memorial Hall, of these the Hall was built and opened first, in July 1906, followed by the adjoining Church in April 1907. The architects were Dotteridge, Thompson & Watford of London. In 1987/88 the church was altered internally to include a church hall and the Barrass Memorial Hall was sold and demolished. The present office block, Geneva House, was built in 1989.

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


County Grammar School for Girls

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

image missing please notify webmaster


During 1910/11 a school was built on this site by the Soke of Peterborough County Council for the education of secondary age girls. The buildings were designed by Annesley Brownrigge and opened in September 1911. The school had its origin in the Pupil Teachers Centre for Girls established in temporary premises in Broadway in 1904. In 1907 this transferred to further temporary prremises in Park Road, and was opened to all girls of Secondary School age. From then, and for the following 30 years, the School was run by the redoubtable duo of Miss Kate Wragge and Miss Harriet Hough. Between 1911 and 1945 the School was called the County School for Girls, and after as The County Grammar School for Girls. Despite proposals in the 1960's to rebuild the school on another site it survived until July 1982 when Cambridgeshire County Council closed it and transferred the staff and other assets to the new Ken Stimpson School at Werrington.

See also our Blue Plaques to Marjorie Pollard and Daphne Jackson who both attended this school. Please use the back button to return to this page.

image missing please notify webmaster

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


Crescent Bridge

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

Crescent Bridge was built in 1913 to overcome the problems generated by the growth and success of Peterborough. It replaced two troublesome level crossings and a subway. The original Crescent of 1830s houses was demolished to make way for the bridge which was built by Cleveland Bridge and Engineering Company of Darlington and subsequently refurbished in 2001 by Jackson Rail.

Following photos thanks to Peterborough Images Archive for their use.

image missing please notify webmaster

The bridge pictured under construction in 1912
(with the railway still in operation below)
 

image missing please notify webmaster

The newly completed bridge just prior to opening in 1913, with the old level crossing
in its final days of use.

image missing please notify webmaster

The Mayor and other dignitaries crossing the bridge during the course of the opening ceremony,
led by the Chief Constable.

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


Deacons School

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

This plaque has been replaced with one of our Blue Plaques in April 2017 so the images displayed here are for historical reference only regarding the development of our plaques programme. To read the history our plaque commemorates please see our Deacons School blue plaque entry by clicking here. To return to this page please use the back button on your browser.

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


The Angel Inn

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

This plaque has been replaced with one of our Blue Plaques in April 2017. The old plaque was located high up on the front of the premises, but our new blue plaque is located to the side of the building in Priestgate. The images displayed here are for historical reference only regarding the development of our plaques programme. To read the history our plaque commemorates please see our Angel Inn blue plaque entry by clicking here. To return to this page please use the back button on your browser.

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


Dr Thomas Walker

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

This plaque has been replaced with one of our Blue Plaques in April 2017 so the images displayed here are for historical reference only regarding the development of our plaques programme. To read the history our plaque commemorates please see our Thomas James Walker blue plaque entry by clicking here. To return to this page please use the back button on your browser.

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


Electric Transport

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

Peterborough's electric trams served the people of Peterborough from 1903 to 1930. They ran from this site to Dogsthorpe, Newark and Walton with a depot at Millfield. Electrical power was supplied from the power station at Albert Meadow, now part of the Rivergate site, by the River Nene. The trams were very popular and in 1924 carried nearly 1.4 million passengers.

Trams seen on Long Causeway below. Photo immediately below left shows two trams waiting to depart the terminus. Thanks to Peterborough Images Archive.

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


Great Northern Hotel

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

Two years after the arrival of the Great Northern Railway the original 13 bedroomed hotel, designed by architect Henry Goddard, was constructed in 1852 by builders Kirk & Parry at a cost of £2,500. In its early years the hotel had its own farm and stables. 12 bedrooms were added when it was extended in 1859. The Crown Prince of Prussia stayed in the hotel in 1863. A serious fire occurred in 1900 and during World War II the hotel closed to make room for London railway engineers. British Transport Hotels added an east wing in 1970 with 20 bedrooms and then sold the hotel in 1982. A notable former owner of the hotel was Peter Boizot, MBE, DL, Freeman of the City who owned the hotel from 1997 to 2009.

11 September 2019. We recently received the below photos of the bread ovens that were located in an outhouse to the hotel, and supplied bread to the hotel, and per the supplier of the photos, also supplied bread to the railway. The ovens were locally made and carry the name "Werner Pfleiderer and Perkins", the company dropped their German names at the outset of World War One (which shows their age) and eventually became Baker Perkins. More information can be found in "A Hundred Years of Baker Perkins" by Rita McKenzie.

The pictures were taken at the time of demolition of the outhouse, the date of which is not known. We are grateful to the supplier for passing the photos to us.

See also our plaque to the Baker Perkins Apprentice School.

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


The Hake Family

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

This plaque has been replaced with one of our Blue Plaques in April 2017 so the images displayed here are for historical reference only regarding the development of our plaques programme. To read the history our plaque commemorates please see our Thomas Hake blue plaque entry by clicking here. To return to this page please use the back button on your browser.

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


Henry Penn

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

Henry Penn (1685-1729) cast over 250 bells at his Bridge Street foundry adjacent to this spot. It stood near to where the Peterborough Magistrates' Court stands today. A canal called 'Bell Dyke' ran to the rear of the foundry joining the River Nene on which many of his bells were floated to their destinations. The bells, mainly large and cast in bronze, were for over 100 buildings, churches, houses and schools in as many as 13 counties in England. Penn was known for his colourful bell inscriptions. At Wrangle church on the east coast of Lincolnshire his inscription on one of six bells reads

ALL SIX HERE MADE IN PETERBOROW BY HENRY PENN FOUNDER 1714

Many of his bells remain to this day.

In 1709 at the age of 24 he cast the first ring of 10 bells in Northamptonshire for Peterborough Cathedral, then in that county. The largest of these 10 bells, one and a half tons in weight, is now called 'The City Bell' and strikes out the time on the Cathedral clock. Penn was apprenticed to his uncle, bellfounder Henry Bagley at Ecton, Northamptonshire. He and his wife Diana had eight children who were baptised in St John's Church, Peterborough, just behind the Market Square.

The website Henry Penn Peterborough Bellfounder may be of interest (will open in a new tab or window).

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu


Sir Henry Royce

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Click on image to enlarge, will open in another window or tab.

image missing please notify webmaster

 

 

Sir Henry Royce, a founder partner of the luxury car and aircraft engine makers Rolls-Ryoce, was born at Alwalton Mill on 27 March 1863. His father James Royce became the miller at Alwalton in 1858 but left within ten years, his tenancy terminating in debt. Whether the young Royce went to school in Alwalton is one of the many uncertain details of his early life. The family left Alwalton when he was very young and went to London. He came back to Peterborough in his teens to be apprenticed at the Great Northern Railway's engineering works at New England, but default was made in the payments of his premium and he had to leave again. Uncertainty surrounds his exact whereabouts until he began in business as an electrical and mechanical engineer in Manchester in 1884. He died in April 1933 and four years later his cremated ashes were buried in Alwalton Church. Alwalton Mill has long since been demolished and the plaque is placed here, on the old school, by kind permission of the owners.

The image left of Sir Henry is from the 1920s and is held at the National Portrait Gallery.

image missing please notify webmaster
image missing please notify webmaster

Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost (1907) described as “the best car in the world”

Supermarine Spitfire powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine.
Shortly before his death, Royce gave instructions that the PV-12 (Merlin) engine be developed using Rolls-Royce’s own funds in advance of any Government order.

To pick another plaque on this page click here or click on Plaques 1985 - 2012 menu

page last changed 18 November 2021